Test of Reliability

Reliability is an essential element of test quality. An instrument for measurement is reliable if it provides consistent results. But a reliable instrument need not be valid. For example, if a clock shows time nonstop then it is reliable, but that does not mean it is showing the correct time. Reliability deals with consistency, or reproducibility of similar results in a test by the test subject, if a test is administered on two occasions; the same conclusions are reached both times. While a test with poor reliability will have remarkably different scores each time with the same test and same examinee.

If a test is then it has to be reliable, but the vice versa is not true. Although, reliability might is not as valuable as validity, but nonetheless reliability it is easier to assess than validity for a test. Reliability has two key aspects: stability and equivalence. The degree of stability can be located comparing the results of repeated measurements with the same candidate and the same instrument. Equivalence means the probability of the amount of errors getting introduced by various investigators or different sample items being studied during the repetition of the test. The best way to test for reliability of a test is that two investigators should compare their observations of the same events. Reliability can be improved in the following ways:

(i) By standardizing the measurement conditions to reduce external factors such as boredom, fatigue, etc. which leads to achievement of stability.

(ii) By detailed directions for measurement which can be generalized and used by trained and motivated persons to conduct research and also by increasing the purview of the sample of items used, this lead to equivalence.

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Selecting the Problem/Subject of Research

The undertaken research problem must be thoroughly selected. For this purpose, the help of a research guide can also be taken. However, since research problems cannot be usually borrowed, each and every researcher must therefore strive to find out his research problem for the study. While buying a new pair of spectacles, we need to cooperate with the optician along with our own preferences in deciding the power of lens. Similarly, a research guide can, at the most, only help the researcher to choose a subject. However, the following points can be observed by the researcher while selecting a research problem/subject:

i.  Generally, the subject, which is overdone, is avoided, as it will be a hard and complex task to throw any new light on such a case that has already been done. Controversial subject should not become the choice of an average researcher. Moreover, too narrow or too vague problems should be avoided.

ii.   The selected research subject should be practical and realistic, so that the related research material/sources are easily available within one’s reach. However, sometimes, even after this it remains still quite difficult to supply absolute ideas regarding how a researcher should acquire the necessary ideas for his research. Thus, for this purpose the researcher should definitely contact an expert or a professor, in the University, who is already occupied in a research. Besides, he may read articles on the subject published in literature and may also get the notions about how the techniques/ideas discussed therein might be functional in obtaining the solutions of other problems. Moreover, he may discuss what he has in his mind, concerning a problem, with others as well. By this way, he should be absolutely successful in selecting a problem by putting his best efforts.

iii.   Some of the other criteria, which must also be considered while selecting a problem, are: importance of the subject, qualifications and training of the researcher, costs involved, and the time factor. In other words, before selecting a problem, the researcher must ask himself the following questions:

  1. Is he well equipped, concerning his background, to conduct the research?
  2. Does the research/study come within the budget he can afford?
  3. Can the necessary cooperation be obtained from those who must participate in the research as subjects?

In case, the answers to all of the above mentioned questions are positive, one may become confident concerning the practicability of the study.

iv.  A preliminary study should most certainly precede the selection of a problem. However, this won’t be necessary regarding the problem needs the conduct of a research closely similar to the one, which has already been conducted. But, usually a brief feasibility study must be undertaken, when the field of inquiry is reasonably new and lacks the availability of a set of well developed techniques.

In conclusion, when the research subject is selected appropriately, by conforming to the above mentioned points, the research will, most probably, not be a boring drudgery. Rather, it will be exciting and educating. The selected subject/problem must involve the researcher and be the prime priority in his mind, so that he may give his best shot required for the study.

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Writing Psychology Papers

The ability to write and communicate well is an important skill for psychology students. There are several specific types of papers that you might be required to write at some point during your academic studies. Learn more about different types of psychology papers and find tips for planning, writing and editing your papers.

Types of Psychology Papers

1. Lab reports describe the events and outcomes of a research project or experiment and have the same          structure as a scholarly journal article. The purpose of the report is to explain how and why you                  performed the experiment, the results of your experiment and your interpretation of the results. Sections      of a lab report include a title page, abstract, introduction, methods, results, references and discussion.

2. Essays in psychology are similar to essays in other subject areas; the purpose of the essay is to clearly        and concisely summarize a topic. A good essay will utilize logical arguments and will have an                      introduction, a body, and a conclusion.

3. A research paper explores a specific theory, concept or topic in depth. The first section should                    summarize the goals of the paper, while the second section presents and summarizes the issues, topics,      or arguments. The final section should critically analyze the information and research that has been            presented and offer a conclusion.

4. A literature review should evaluate and summarize research that is related to a particular concept,              theory or topic. These papers are critical in nature and should present an overview of the field of                research and a specific thesis. Arguments for the thesis should be presented in the main section of the        paper.

 

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